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The symptoms associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can often be debilitating, significantly affecting a patient’s quality of life. Air Force mental health professionals have successfully treated many Airmen with the use of prolonged exposure therapy. Through this collaborative therapy, the patient is safely and gradually exposed to trauma-related memories and situations that have been avoided. The eventual goal is to alter the patient’s relationship with and reaction to the traumatic event so it no longer affects their quality of life and ability to do their job. (U.S. Air Force graphic by Josh Mahler) A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD
Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
0 7/03
2018
Maj. Shane Runyon (right), Baltimore’s Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills (C-STARS) program deputy director, and Master Sgt. Sean Patterson, a respiratory therapist and superintendent of C-STARS Baltimore, set up for patient arrival at the Trauma Resuscitation Unit (TRU) at the University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, June 13, 2018. The U.S. Air Force’s C-STARS Baltimore program partners with the R Cowley Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland Medical Center to ensure medical Airmen train on the latest trauma care techniques. These techniques prepare medical Airmen to treat trauma patients in a deployed setting. (Courtesy photo) Baltimore C-STARS partnership prepares Airmen for battlefield medicine
Civilian partnerships are a vital readiness resource for the Air Force Medical Service, refreshing medics on trauma skills and taking lessons learned to deliver life-saving trauma care downrange. The Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills program in Baltimore, Maryland, prepares medical Airmen for deployment through immersive training at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.
0 7/03
2018
Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, receives a briefing from 2nd Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations squadron room nurse, on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at Keesler Medical Center, Miss., June 16, 2017. The training program was stood up in March, 2017 and has trained surgical teams within the Air Force and across the Department of the Defense. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue). Robotic surgery training program aims at improving patient outcomes
As the use of surgical robotics increases, the Air Force Medical Service is training its surgical teams in the latest technology, ensuring patients have access to the most advanced surgical procedures and best possible outcomes.
0 2/06
2018
Default Air Force Logo Offutt Celebrates Biomedical Science Corps
Biomedical Science Corps appreciation week is Jan. 22 – 26 and although they fly under the radar, the BSC team has been working hard for the past 51 years to keep Airman healthy and performing the mission.  The BSC consists of nearly 2,300 officers in 18 different career fields supported by 6,400 enlisted members, making it the most diverse corps
0 1/18
2018
U.S. Air Force Maj. Stephanie Proellochs relies on her wheelchair as she heads in to her daily physical therapy session at Walter Reed Medical Center, Nov. 8, 2017. Proellochs received a below-the-knee amputation in September 2017 to treat a malignant tumor that had metastasized and spread. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) Every journey begins with a single step – An Airman’s story of resiliency (Part 1)
Maj. Stephanie Proellochs, a Medical Service Corps officer, was fighting cancer, overcoming the odds and set on returning to active duty. Unfortunately, just when the finish line was in sight, new challenges presented themselves.
0 1/01
2018
Default Air Force Logo Annual Consent for Automatic Prescription Refills Begins Sept. 1
Beginning Sept. 1, 2017, Express Scripts will need annual consent from patients who want to receive automatic refills of their maintenance medications enrolled in TRICARE Pharmacy Home Delivery. This means that just before one of your prescriptions runs out of refills, Express Scripts will reach out to you to know if you would like your doctor to be contacted to renew the prescription and if you’d like to continue in the Automatic Refill program. If not, Express Scripts will not refill your prescription.
0 8/17
2017
Default Air Force Logo 55th Wing recognizes National Nurses Week
The nurses and medical technicians of the Fighting Fifty-Fifth, Ehrling Bergquist Clinic encourage you to learn a bit more about the advancement of their craft during the annual observance of National Nurses Week, May 6 - 12.According to American Nurses Association, this year’s observance theme is “Nursing: the Balance of Mind, Body, and Spirit.” 
0 5/08
2017
Preventing illness or injury is the goal of the Air Force’s Preventive Medicine program, a topic that is highlighted in August during Preventive Health Month.  (AF Graphic) Preventive measures lead to a healthier Air Force
Preventing illness or injury is the goal of the Air Force’s Preventive Medicine program, a topic that is highlighted in August during Preventive Health Month. Preventive Health extends beyond health care at an individual level, concentrating rather on the health of individuals, communities and specific populations to help groups reduce their risk
0 8/02
2016
As the potential for infected mosquitoes to reach the U.S. rises, the Air Force continues to closely monitor the emergence of Zika virus infection to help inform and protect Airmen and their families. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all at-risk communities should prepare for possible Zika virus activity. AF continues to monitor Zika virus, infected mosquitoes could hit U.S. this summer
As the potential for infected mosquitoes to reach the U.S. rises, the Air Force continues to closely monitor the emergence of Zika virus infection to help inform and protect Airmen and their families. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, all at-risk communities should prepare for possible Zika virus activity. As of Feb. 1,
0 6/08
2016
The Behavioral Health Optimization Program, or BHOP, integrates behavioral health personnel into primary care clinics, to provide “the right care, at the right time, in the right place.” Beneficiaries with behavioral health concerns can seek care directly through their primary care manager. Air Force increases access to behavioral health care
Nearly half of people with a treatable behavioral health disorder do not seek help from behavioral health professionals, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. However, 80 percent of this population does visit a primary care manager at least once a year. The Air Force Behavioral Health Optimization Program seeks to bridge
0 6/08
2016
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