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  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment. The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well helps Airmen focus on the mission.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
  • Baltimore C-STARS partnership prepares Airmen for battlefield medicine

    Civilian partnerships are a vital readiness resource for the Air Force Medical Service, refreshing medics on trauma skills and taking lessons learned to deliver life-saving trauma care downrange. The Center for the Sustainment of Trauma and Readiness Skills program in Baltimore, Maryland, prepares medical Airmen for deployment through immersive training at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center.
  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
  • A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
  • Deployment Programs support Airmen and their families

    Families of deployed military members have resources available to them they may not be aware of at the 55th Force Support Squadron’s Airmen and Family Readiness Center located in building 323C, room 206.The A&FRC provides resources to meet the needs of Airmen and their families throughout the deployment cycle.“Our aim is to take care of whatever
  • A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness

    As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
  • Air Force lab puts medical devices through their paces

    “We break stuff,” said Lt. Col. Brandi Ritter, chief of the Air Force Medical Evaluation Support Activity, showing off the facility where her unit tests the devices medical Airmen use to complete their mission.
  • SECAF: Accelerating defendable space, multi-domain operations key to future readiness

    Secretary of the Air Force Heather Wilson testified before the U.S. House of Representatives Armed Services Committee about the Air Force’s fiscal year 2019 budget March 20, 2018, in Washington, D.C.
  • Airman proves the importance of mission readiness on Trusted Care

    November 12, 2016 began as another normal day at Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan for Senior Airman Nicole Moore. That day was anything but normal.
  • Strengthening Trusted Care culture in Air Force medicine

    On October 26th, 2017, over 130 leaders across various health care organizations gathered to listen to Col. Christian Lyons and Lt. Col. Michael Fea speak on Trusted Care’s aim of positioning the Air Force Medical Service as a high reliability organization.
  • Airman upholds the Trusted Care principles through the delivery of efficient care and patient satisfaction

    For U.S. Air Force MSgt Ashley Strong, delivering patient-centered Trusted Care is more than a policy. For this Air Force dental flight chief, Trusted Care is about using the expertise and experiences of all Air Force Medical Service (AFMS) Airmen at every level to find better ways to provide quality, patient-centered care.
  • Medically ready to be mission ready

    From periodic health assessments to regular dental exams, every Airman should know the importance of maintaining their Individual Medical Readiness (IMR) at all times.
  • 97th IS gains embedded MFLC

    A Military & Family Life Counselor was embedded within the 97th Intelligence Squadron to provide full time support for the unit at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, on Nov. 27, 2017.The counselor fills the gap left by the loss of the 97th IS in-house mental health provider whose schedule no longer permitted the part-time annexed care.The MFLCs
  • Air Force Special Operations medics delivered care and rebuilt infrastructure after Caribbean hurricanes

    In the wake of the devastation left by Hurricane Irma this September, disaster relief efforts mobilized across the Caribbean as soon as the storm returned to sea. Small teams of Air Force Special Operations medics from the 27th Special Operations Wing were among the first disaster relief teams on the ground, executing a mission for which they are uniquely suited.
  • Air Force pharmacists support deployed missions

    When most people think of pharmacists, they imagine a local drug store or the pharmacy counter at their military treatment facility. Those are common locations to encounter pharmacists, but many people might not know that Air Force pharmacists also provide critical deployed medical support, offering their medication expertise in deployed theaters around the world.
  • Good mental health critical to readiness

    Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
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