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Presentation kicks off domestic violence awareness month

Guest speaker Rachael Frost, Master Investigator IV for the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department in California, speaks during a Domestic Violence Awareness Month Presentation Oct. 2, 2018, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. . Bringing awareness to the issues of domestic violence is one way to decrease the shame, guilt and stigma victims feel and bring about education on this topic and where to go for services. (U.S. Air Force photo by L. Cunningham)

Guest speaker Rachael Frost, Master Investigator IV for the Riverside County Sheriff’s Department in California, speaks during a Domestic Violence Awareness Month Presentation Oct. 2, 2018, at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. . Bringing awareness to the issues of domestic violence is one way to decrease the shame, guilt and stigma victims feel and bring about education on this topic and where to go for services. (U.S. Air Force photo by L. Cunningham)

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. --

Team Offutt kicked off Domestic Violence Awareness Month by having a Riverside County, California investigator provide a presentation Oct. 2 entitled, “Missing You: The Relationship between Mass Homicides and Domestic Violence.”

Rachel Frost, a master investigator IV, discussed the mentality of people who choose to commit mass homicide and how similar that is to the mentality of someone who perpetrates domestic violence.

Frost’s presentation was geared towards those who work with domestic violence, like the members of the 55th Security Forces Squadron.

“Over 100 of our defenders were able to be a part of this training and many said they learned valuable insights that they will take forward with them in their work,” said Ginny Wescott, 55th Wing violence prevention integrator.

During her presentation, Frost said domestic violence happens every day to people we all know. She shared the extremely dangerous warning signs of strangulation and what the field is doing to try and assist people who have been subjected to this trauma.

“Domestic violence, including strangulation, is a serious issue that affects many families in our Air Force community,” Wescott said. “Men and women can be both victim and offender.”

Frost said domestic violence reaches across social, economic, cultural, ethnic and religious lines. She said it also comes in many forms like emotional, physical and sexual and involves one person having power and control over another.

“Domestic violence is not someone else’s problem, it is our problem,” Wescott said.

Throughout Domestic Violence Awareness Month the “Silent Witness,” “Clothesline Project” and “Hidden Hurt” displays will be setup at locations around the installation for viewing.

“I would encourage everyone to please take a moment to read the information posted and remember how violence affects those around us,” Wescott said.

Wescott added that it is important to understand domestic violence, how to prevent and recognize it, and the resources available to help when domestic violence becomes an issue for a family.

“The end to family violence in the military starts with us,” she said. “If you are a victim and need help, please call the Safe Helpline at 877-995-5247.”

If you have any questions about Domestic Violence Awareness Month, please contact Dale Sundermann at dale.sundermann.1@us.af.mil or 294-7886.