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  • Intensive Out Patient Care Program Implemented at Offutt AFB

    There is a new Intensive Out Patient Care Program with in Ehrling Bergquist Clinic at Offutt Air Force Base. IOPs presently exist at a handful of bases throughout the Air Force. Due to the success of these programs, the mental health clinic saw it as a tremendous opportunity to provide Offutt with additional mental health services.
  • Mental health providers, leadership partner for deployment resiliency, readiness

    Deployed mental health providers work closely with leadership to help maintain warfighter resiliency and readiness. Service members are away from their usual support systems during deployment, and because the environment and stress puts them in unusual situations, they require innovative and flexible forms of mental health care.
  • Turn stress into strength this holiday season

    The holiday season presents opportunities to engage in multiple forms of resiliency. Engaging in close relationships, practicing gratitude, and participating in religious activities that promote spirituality are often helpful aspects of the holidays. However, the holidays may also create stressors that are unique to this time of year.
  • Resilient kids, ready Airmen

    One thing Airmen worry about when they deploy is the well-being of their family, especially children who may have a hard time coping with the challenges that come with a parent’s deployment. The impact of deployment on children is a key component of Airmen readiness. Knowing their family is well helps Airmen focus on the mission.
  • A peek behind the curtain: Prolonged exposure therapy for PTSD

    Post-traumatic stress disorder can be debilitating, but there are therapies that can reduce symptoms, improve quality of life, and help Airmen return to duty. One of the most effective therapies, practiced by many Air Force mental health professionals, is prolonged exposure therapy.
  • A peek behind the curtain: The first step of PTSD care

    Perhaps the most difficult part of seeking help for post-traumatic stress disorder is making that first appointment, since Airmen are often unsure of what to expect. Not knowing what to expect from mental health providers can get in the way of effective PTSD treatment.
  • A peek behind the curtain: PTSD barriers and stigmas

    Effective treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder is possible, but many Airmen falsely think seeking medical help for PTSD will hurt their career and will not help them get better. These stigmas and misconceptions create perceived barriers, preventing Airmen from seeking care. Delaying treatment can cause the anxiety and fear following a traumatic event to affect an Airman’s readiness.
  • A day in the life: Mental health supports Airmen, readiness

    As with any Air Force healthcare provider, Capt. Daniel Gibson, a clinical psychologist with the 92nd medical group, Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington, relies on a collaborative, patient-centered approach to care.The mental health clinic at Fairchild Air Force Base uses a collaborative approach to ensure the best patient care.
  • 97th IS gains embedded MFLC

    A Military & Family Life Counselor was embedded within the 97th Intelligence Squadron to provide full time support for the unit at Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska, on Nov. 27, 2017.The counselor fills the gap left by the loss of the 97th IS in-house mental health provider whose schedule no longer permitted the part-time annexed care.The MFLCs
  • Good mental health critical to readiness

    Mental health is a critical part of every Airman’s medical readiness. Although many service members worry that seeking mental health care will negatively effect their career, the opposite is usually true. With early identification and the right treatment by a medical professional, most mental health issues get better quickly without any negative career impact.
  • Suicide prevention month: stopping suicide is everyone’s battle

    September is Suicide Prevention Month, a time for Americans to build awareness and help understand suicide in our culture. More than 40,000 Americans lose their life due to suicide each year and research shows that rates in the military and the general population are very close. The loss of any one person to suicide is a tragedy, and that is why
  • New annual Mental Health Assessment requirement begins July 31

    Starting July 31, 2017, Airmen undergoing their annual Periodic Health Assessment may notice something new. A Mental Health Assessment will now be part of every annual PHA, to help ensure that Airmen suffering from undiagnosed mental health issues are referred to the necessary care. Mental health issues are a serious problem for U.S. Armed Forces
  • PTSD Awareness leads to positive treatment

    Post-traumatic Stress Disorder can be debilitating in some patients, but thanks to advancements in research and the continued training of mental health providers, treatments are getting better all the time.Maj. Joel Foster, Chief of Air Force Deployment Mental Health, said treating PTSD has improved dramatically in the last 20 years.“Twenty years
  • Coping with stress through healthy thinking

    Stress. Even the mention of the word can increase anxiety for some. Everyone deals with stress differently, but how a person copes with daily stressors can have great impacts on their quality of life and overall health.
  • Air Force increases access to behavioral health care

    Nearly half of people with a treatable behavioral health disorder do not seek help from behavioral health professionals, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. However, 80 percent of this population does visit a primary care manager at least once a year. The Air Force Behavioral Health Optimization Program seeks to bridge
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