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Flood recovery: 55th SFS office relocation

The outside of Turner Hall dormitory.

The 55th Security Forces Squadron staff is finally scheduled to relocate into 36 newly renovated office spaces in a base dormitory here Nov. 25, 2019.

The outside of Turner Hall dormitory.

The 55th Security Forces Squadron staff is finally scheduled to relocate into 36 newly renovated office spaces in a base dormitory here Nov. 25, 2019.

The outside of Turner Hall dormitory.

The 55th Security Forces Squadron staff is finally scheduled to relocate into 36 newly renovated office spaces in a base dormitory here Nov. 25, 2019.

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. --

The 55th Security Forces Squadron staff, currently working from seven different facilities, was among many Team Offutt agencies without offices and dispersed around base, due to the flood in March. Many offices and buildings were ruined, which was estimated at over $420 million in repairs.

To reconsolidate the unit while their new facility is constructed, they will be moved into a  dormitory that has been repurposed as office space. 

“We’re one of the largest squadrons on base, so finding the appropriate amount of space was difficult,” said Senior Master Sgt. Shane Sudman, 55th SFS operations and training superintendent.

The dorm option came into play this past summer, with the initial move-in date in August.

The two biggest challenges were that the 55th Civil Engineer Squadron had to remodel and repaint the rooms, and they had to make sure light fixtures, sinks and toilets were good to go, said Sudman. The communications portion was more difficult than what they initially expected, which is the reason it got pushed to a November-December time frame.

The 55th Communications Squadron had to figure out how to install more fiber optic cable, and get the internet up and running in living spaces that weren’t initially allocated for offices.

Jaimie Rempe, 55th SFS resource advisor, was able to procure $145,000 in funds to purchase office furniture, and make needed updates before the end of the fiscal year.

“We’ve been fractured for more than six months, and communication between displaced staff members is not always accurate,” Sudman said. “You can appreciate how cumbersome it can be when you’re trying to make quick decisions but the staff is not together. This move will bring synergy.”