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Offutt dentist helps furry patient get back to work

U.S. Air Force Col. Marco Galvez, left, chief endodontist of the 55th Dental Squadron, and U.S. Army Capt. Brian Adams, right, branch chief of Offutt's veterinarian services, perform a root canal on Dasty, a military working dog from the 55th Security Forces Squadron March 7, 2017 at  the Offutt Air Force Base Veterinary Treatment Facility. (Courtesy photo)

U.S. Air Force Col. Marco Galvez, left, chief endodontist of the 55th Dental Squadron, and U.S. Army Capt. Brian Adams, right, branch chief of Offutt's veterinarian services, perform a root canal on Dasty, a military working dog from the 55th Security Forces Squadron March 7, 2017 at the Offutt Air Force Base Veterinary Treatment Facility. (Courtesy photo)

OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. --

Through a pre-established relationship, a dentist from the 55th Dental Squadron and his assistant were recently called in to assist the Veterinary Treatment Facility with a root canal on a Military Working Dog named Dasty.

 

“Not all veterinary clinics are set up with the equipment needed to perform root canals, and not all veterinarians are comfortable performing root canals,” said U.S. Army Capt. Brian Adams, Offutt veterinarian services branch chief. “Having the relationship with the [Ehrling Bergquist Clinic], where they are able to bring any extra equipment and their expertise, is invaluable.”

The joint effort also exemplified the One Health initiative, a worldwide strategy focused on advancing health care and creating interdisciplinary synergy in treating humans and animals.

“It’s really just a collaboration when it comes to human health and animal health and having all the key players working together,” Adams said.

Adams discovered the fractured tooth during a routine dental cleaning and contacted Col. Marco Galvez, 55th DS chief endodontist, and his assistant William Hooper. They responded within 30 minutes to assist with the problem tooth. Adams administered the anesthesia and provided canine-specific guidance to Galvez and Hooper, who diagnosed and performed a root canal on the problem tooth.

“We proceeded just like a regular human molar,” Galvez said. “It is a little bit more challenging and different than the normal anatomy we are used to, but we were able to manage with radiographic images and the clinical findings.”

This was the second time Col. Galvez and his team have assisted the VTF with a root canal.

Dasty’s fractured tooth was most likely injured while performing bite work. Thanks to a team effort, Dasty is back on the job doing what he does best.

“Everything is good and his bite work is outstanding,” said Staff Sgt. Jahmal Hardy, an MWD trainer from the 55th Security Forces Squadron. “Dasty is doing great!”